Using Smart Technology to Improve Life on the Go

CytexOne Solutions Make Life Easier, More Comfortable, & Remarkably Efficient

The City of New York was recently awarded the “2016 Best Smart City” by the Smart City Expo World Congress. The award recognizes cutting-edge initiatives that help resolve urban challenges and benefit cities and their residents. Much like the city is innovating so too our local businesses and corporations. CytexOne, a developer of intelligent, connected environments, is focused on smart homes as well as smart hotels. Their mission: to show the world that well designed, well thought out applications of wireless and other technologies makes life easier, more comfortable, more affordable and remarkably efficient.

What is new with IoT in 2016?

We are less than 2 weeks into the New Year and a lot is brewing. At the CES show in Las Vegas, IoT products and tech concepts have been making a big splash.  IoT in 2016 is about smarter devices, more connectivity, and then the need to manage and control and operate all these ‘things’ with the least amount of tools and expense.

Creating Great Experiences for Our Customers

At CytexOne, we love what we do. We strive to be exceptional. Most importantly, we want our customers to love what we can accomplish to their benefit.

Making technology simple is just the start.  We are driven by the best-in-class technology, from homes, to commercial buildings, hotels, real estate and MDUs, we specialize in IoT, M2M, networking and Audio Visual (AV). We are motivated to stay ahead of the curve. To that end, we constantly test new ideas and technology to  incorporate into our tried and true systems. 

How Best of Breed Works for You

Is your technology partner offering only a narrow range of single vendor and proprietary IoT products for your smart home, hotel or commercial building project?

This is a really big question. The fact is, many of the larger companies advertising robust smart technologies have plenty of financial incentive to do just that, because selling volume products from just one or two of the big vendors can result in much steeper discounts for them, keeping their costs and installation hours lower. Unfortunately, this age old practice of ‘big IT’ is usually at the expense of you, the customer!

Press Coverage: Barron’s – New TVs, New Advisors

by Glenn Kenny

The world of home entertainment technology is evolving at breakneck speed. In the same way flat-screen televisions made the tube television as quaint as a rotary phone virtually overnight, the once familiar plasma display panels are now on the way out.

They are being replaced by 4K display, which delivers 4,000 pixels of resolution, a huge leap over the current home high-definition format, which maxes out at 1,080 pixels. The 4K display televisions range in size from 39 to 85 inches and prices, accordingly, range from $500 to $40,000.

Child’s Play

A bright, colorful touchscreen is tough for any kid to ignore. And although they are meant to be touched, those eye-catching buttons can cause real havoc around the house when poked by the curious fingers of a 5-year-old. Unbeknownst to you, that little rascal has reset the thermostats and disarmed the security system. Given the amazing technical aptitude of most kids, he may have even discovered how to get at the R-rated movies you keep on your own DVR.

Press Coverage: New York Times – How Smart Could I Make My Dumb Manhattan Apartment?

SOMEBODY in my apartment is not very smart, and since I live alone, it is obviously the machines.

Here is how clueless they are: If I hit the remote for the Bose CD player in the living room, the Bose iPod dock 10 feet away turns itself on. The DVD player, VCR and cable all have their own remotes, which refuse to communicate with one another. The radiator and air-conditioning units must be adjusted with a lever, and they have only three settings: Comfortable, until you get into bed; Too Hot or Too Cold, as you are falling asleep; and Shoveling Coal on the Titanic, at 3 in the morning. And while I have never left the house with the gas on — a fear that apparently is passed down genetically — I worry, as I grow older, that this might happen.

Press Coverage: Hampton’s Magazine – Bankers Buck the Boardroom, Do Business on the Beach

From a story printed August 24, 2012: Sagg Main beach, Monday, 7 AM. Amid the joggers and dog walkers taking advantage of the quiet are what looks (from a distance at least) like people absorbed in very serious reading. The text in question must be weighty given the concentration on their faces (e.g., furrowed brows despite the Botox). One might even conclude they were praying.

They’re not. Upon closer examination, it’s not a well-worn novel you see in their hands but an iPad, BlackBerry, or iPhone. And what is it they’re reading? The latest Bloomberg feeds, of course. A morning stroll before the US stock markets open at 9:30 am is the ideal moment to catch up on financial news and prepare for a day of trading—by the pool. Dan Levine, CEO of CytexOne, a top technology company with headquarters in Manhattan that caters to a broad range of customers, including NYC-based bankers and Hollywood stars with Hamptons homes, says technology is now so effective that a banker could, on occasion, go missing from the office for a week and no one would notice. “You can now transfer work calls from your mobile using the office system,” he says. “Your PA might never figure out that you were on the beach.”

Press Coverage: New York Times — Nobody Home But Us Gadgets

A NEW condominium conversion in southern SoHo celebrates 19th-century craftsmanship on the outside and 21st-century precision on the inside. At 34 Greene Street, the Sorgente Group has combined two 1873 buildings that once housed a printing company into a seven-unit condominium with a common lobby. The developers have restored the handcrafted cornices of the facades and wired the interiors to allow the electronics to be programmed from anywhere via Sorgente’s parent company, based in Rome, specializes in “historic and trophy properties” and owns controlling shares of the Chrysler and Flatiron Buildings. No. 34 Greene Street is Sorgente’s first downtown residential property; records show it was acquired for $14.8 million in June 2007.

The units, said Veronica Mainetti, head of the developer’s United States activities, are designed to appeal to Europeans seeking pieds-à-terre. They include bidets and Italian travertine in the bathrooms, programmable radiators and Miele kitchen appliances. Roman cobblestones line the lobby. Some units include the original brick walls.

Press Coverage: New York Sun — Developers Use Technology to Distinguish their Properties

Originally Published in the New York Sun, October 18, 2007

Technology is the latest amenity New York’s condominium developers are using to wow potential buyers.

Many developers are installing building integration systems that allow residents to communicate with the concierge, valet, doorman, and others by using an interactive touch screen. Also offered are home automation features that control lighting, temperature, blinds, music, and video. Techno-savvy buyers expect, and even demand, a high level of automation in their new homes, and many are plunking down hundreds of thousands of dollars to obtain it.