Press Coverage: New York Times – How Smart Could I Make My Dumb Manhattan Apartment?

SOMEBODY in my apartment is not very smart, and since I live alone, it is obviously the machines.

Here is how clueless they are: If I hit the remote for the Bose CD player in the living room, the Bose iPod dock 10 feet away turns itself on. The DVD player, VCR and cable all have their own remotes, which refuse to communicate with one another. The radiator and air-conditioning units must be adjusted with a lever, and they have only three settings: Comfortable, until you get into bed; Too Hot or Too Cold, as you are falling asleep; and Shoveling Coal on the Titanic, at 3 in the morning. And while I have never left the house with the gas on — a fear that apparently is passed down genetically — I worry, as I grow older, that this might happen.

Press Coverage: New York Times — Nobody Home But Us Gadgets

A NEW condominium conversion in southern SoHo celebrates 19th-century craftsmanship on the outside and 21st-century precision on the inside. At 34 Greene Street, the Sorgente Group has combined two 1873 buildings that once housed a printing company into a seven-unit condominium with a common lobby. The developers have restored the handcrafted cornices of the facades and wired the interiors to allow the electronics to be programmed from anywhere via Sorgente’s parent company, based in Rome, specializes in “historic and trophy properties” and owns controlling shares of the Chrysler and Flatiron Buildings. No. 34 Greene Street is Sorgente’s first downtown residential property; records show it was acquired for $14.8 million in June 2007.

The units, said Veronica Mainetti, head of the developer’s United States activities, are designed to appeal to Europeans seeking pieds-à-terre. They include bidets and Italian travertine in the bathrooms, programmable radiators and Miele kitchen appliances. Roman cobblestones line the lobby. Some units include the original brick walls.

Press Coverage: New York Sun — Developers Use Technology to Distinguish their Properties

Originally Published in the New York Sun, October 18, 2007

Technology is the latest amenity New York’s condominium developers are using to wow potential buyers.

Many developers are installing building integration systems that allow residents to communicate with the concierge, valet, doorman, and others by using an interactive touch screen. Also offered are home automation features that control lighting, temperature, blinds, music, and video. Techno-savvy buyers expect, and even demand, a high level of automation in their new homes, and many are plunking down hundreds of thousands of dollars to obtain it.