Take Advantage of the latest Hotel Trend: LED Lighting Control

CytexOne Transforms Miami Hotels with Cost-cutting Solutions

The first light-emitting diode was invented in 1962, but it took many years before the improved lighting technology hit mainstream use. Now, the global LED market has hit $4.8 billion, and it shows no sign of stopping such growth-rate in the future. The largest adoption of LEDs has been in commercial spaces such as office buildings and factories, but recently, hotels have begun to take advantage of the benefits of LED lighting. Is it time for your Florida hotel to embrace the energy efficiency and design versatility of hotel lighting control? Continue reading to find out.

Game Changing Experiences Coming to Brooklyn’s William Vale Hotel

We are very proud to have recently had the opportunity to announce our newest customer, the William Vale Hotel Hotel. The William Vale is a progressive and highly unique hotel concept that is rising in up Brooklyn, along with the rest of the neighborhood’s renaissance.

CytexOne wants to be known for installing agile and adaptable technology solutions, and the William Vale Hotel fits this to a tee. We share a love of technology and commitment to showcasing a solid and exciting hospitality solution. Opening early 2016, the William Vale will be a full-service smart hotel will put a great emphasis both on guest comfort and automation for staff, resulting in automation and luxury.

IT Best of Breed: Hospitality Sector ‘The Perfect IoT Environment’ according to CytexOne

By Mark Haranas, editor CRN and Best of Breed (BOB) editor

Internet of Things specialist CytexOne is diving head first into the hospitality industry by forming its own CytexOne Hospitality full-service division to capitalize on opportunities emerging in the IoT market.

CytexOne, which been working in IoT for over a decade, says the new division provides integrated platforms and infrastructure to hotels around the globe while delivering “high-performance” IoT solutions for hospitality organizations, according to CEO Dan Levine.

IoT Evolution: The IoT Comes to Hospitality with First Smart Hotels

Written by Ken Briodagh

The Connected Home is becoming a thing of the present, and, thanks to a new project from CytexOne, so is the Connected Home-away-from-home.

CytexOne is a developer of intelligent, connected environments, and it has launched a new initiative called CytexOne Hospitality, which is said to be the first and only company dedicated to creating and managing smart hotel environments. The goal is to deploy IoT solutions for hospitality businesses that will improve staff productivity, guest comfort and building energy efficiency and security while maintaining a connected environment.

Press Coverage: Barron’s – New TVs, New Advisors

by Glenn Kenny

The world of home entertainment technology is evolving at breakneck speed. In the same way flat-screen televisions made the tube television as quaint as a rotary phone virtually overnight, the once familiar plasma display panels are now on the way out.

They are being replaced by 4K display, which delivers 4,000 pixels of resolution, a huge leap over the current home high-definition format, which maxes out at 1,080 pixels. The 4K display televisions range in size from 39 to 85 inches and prices, accordingly, range from $500 to $40,000.

Automation for Insomniacs

Restless, sleepless nights: they happen to everyone. Whether you can’t wind down, relax your mind or simply get comfortable, insomnia is bound to strike. If you suffer from occasional sleep deprivation, there are home technologies that can help. Their effectiveness might not be scientifically proven, but the when they’re set up correctly they’ll at least create an atmosphere that’s conducive to catching a few zzzzzs.

Sweet Lullaby. Soft, gentle music can ease you into sleep, and there’s no better way to do this than with a whole-house music system that can be programmed to play sleep-inducing music over the bedroom speakers. A home systems installer can set up the system to send tunes to the bedroom every night at 11 p.m., for example. Conversely, the upbeat, loud music can go to the room promptly at 6 a.m. every weekday morning as your automated wake-up call.

Fade to Black. As the music plays, a lighting system can gradually lower the intensity of the lights over whatever time period you specify. It’s a nice feature for anyone in the family, especially kids who may be afraid of the dark. Like the music, the adjustments of the lights can happen automatically, or you can activate the features by tapping a button on a keypad, touchpanel, your smartphone or tablet.

Curtain Calls. If your bedroom has motorized draperies or shades, add them to the bedtime routine. Per a predetermined schedule, they can close to block out the sun and provide the privacy you need for peaceful slumber.

Pathway Lights. Nothing sabotages sleep like bright lights do, so rather than have the bedroom (and bathroom) fixtures go to full brightness when you turn them on for a midnight trip to the bathroom, a lighting control system can keep them at a level that’s easier on the eyes, from the hours of 11 p.m. until 6 a.m., for example.

If you suffer from insomnia, ask your home systems installer about these and other routines he can set up put you on a path to a better night’s sleep.

 

Press Coverage: New York Times – How Smart Could I Make My Dumb Manhattan Apartment?

SOMEBODY in my apartment is not very smart, and since I live alone, it is obviously the machines.

Here is how clueless they are: If I hit the remote for the Bose CD player in the living room, the Bose iPod dock 10 feet away turns itself on. The DVD player, VCR and cable all have their own remotes, which refuse to communicate with one another. The radiator and air-conditioning units must be adjusted with a lever, and they have only three settings: Comfortable, until you get into bed; Too Hot or Too Cold, as you are falling asleep; and Shoveling Coal on the Titanic, at 3 in the morning. And while I have never left the house with the gas on — a fear that apparently is passed down genetically — I worry, as I grow older, that this might happen.

Press Coverage: New York Times — Nobody Home But Us Gadgets

A NEW condominium conversion in southern SoHo celebrates 19th-century craftsmanship on the outside and 21st-century precision on the inside. At 34 Greene Street, the Sorgente Group has combined two 1873 buildings that once housed a printing company into a seven-unit condominium with a common lobby. The developers have restored the handcrafted cornices of the facades and wired the interiors to allow the electronics to be programmed from anywhere via Sorgente’s parent company, based in Rome, specializes in “historic and trophy properties” and owns controlling shares of the Chrysler and Flatiron Buildings. No. 34 Greene Street is Sorgente’s first downtown residential property; records show it was acquired for $14.8 million in June 2007.

The units, said Veronica Mainetti, head of the developer’s United States activities, are designed to appeal to Europeans seeking pieds-à-terre. They include bidets and Italian travertine in the bathrooms, programmable radiators and Miele kitchen appliances. Roman cobblestones line the lobby. Some units include the original brick walls.

Press Coverage: New York Sun — Developers Use Technology to Distinguish their Properties

Originally Published in the New York Sun, October 18, 2007

Technology is the latest amenity New York’s condominium developers are using to wow potential buyers.

Many developers are installing building integration systems that allow residents to communicate with the concierge, valet, doorman, and others by using an interactive touch screen. Also offered are home automation features that control lighting, temperature, blinds, music, and video. Techno-savvy buyers expect, and even demand, a high level of automation in their new homes, and many are plunking down hundreds of thousands of dollars to obtain it.